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From all of us at Premier to all of you!
Happy Holidays!

Congratulations!

Kyle Sullivan
Kyle Sullivan
First Solo
October 21, 2014

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Congratulations!

Gerry Wilcox
Gerry Wilcox
Private Pilot
October 25, 2014

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Congratulations!

Nicolas Mouney
Nicolas Mouney
Private Pilot
December 4, 2014

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Congratulations!

Ryan Bennett
Ryan Bennett
Private Pilot
November 15, 2014

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Congratulations!

Ryan Snyder
Ryan Snyder
Commercial Pilot
November 14, 2014

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Congratulations!

Kyle Farringer
Kyle Farringer
Private Pilot
November 8, 2014

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Congratulations!

Chhan Phenn
Chhan Phenn
First Solo
October 18, 2014

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Congratulations!

Ian Macala
Ian Macala
Commercial Pilot
October 17, 2014

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Congratulations!

Ben Arledge
Ben Arledge
First Solo
October 13, 2014

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Congratulations!

Alex Province

Alex Province
First Solo
October 13, 2014

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Congratulations!

Mark Welch

Mark Welch
First Solo
October 12, 2014

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Congratulations!

Andrew Zychek

Andrew Zychek
First Solo
September 23, 2014

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Congratulations!

Matt Covello

Matt Covello
Private Pilot
September 18, 2014

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United States Airforce Band Delights Smithsonian Guests

Premier on Social Media

 

Social Media sites like Facebook, Twitter, and Google+ provide a great platform to share ideas and disseminate information quickly! To that end, we at Premier would like to encourage you to check theses sites often as we will be posting much more frequently.

Look for:
  • Office closures due to weather or holidays.
  • Pertinent airport information.
  • Your acomplishments!
  • Announcements.

We would also like to encourage YOU to post whatever's on your mind. Share great pics. Great $100 hamburger destinations. Whatever you can think of!

Just look at the top of the page for links to the different sites. We're also looking to expand our presence into other sites such as Instagram or Pinterest. Stay tuned!

What will you do with a pilot license?
Travel!

 

East along the Connecticut Shore from over Bridgeport, Connecticut.When Seth Rae earned his Private Pilot Certificate in December 2013, he took to the skies and began checking off items on the to-do list that he had made in his mind even before he began flight training. On January 20, 2014, Seth flew to Long Island Republic Airport (FRG) in Farmingdale, New York to visit a longtime friend, and to go flying together. On the way back to Hartford-Brainard, he snapped this amazing shot of the Connecticut Shoreline from overhead Bridgeport, Connecticut. Seth has also posted a video of a previous flight to FRG.

What else will you do with a pilot license?
Fly The Hudson River Corridor!


The Statue Of Liberty

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One of the exciting things about flying in New England is our close proximity to world famous places in iconic American cities. Here are some photos for you to enjoy taken during a recent flight down the New York City Hudson River Corridor.

Matt Graniero was kind enought to share the pictures he took. Our thanks to him!

 


Approaching the construction site of the Freedom Tower.

Approaching the Freedom Tower       The Freedom Tower in New York


The Manhattan skyline!

A view of Manhattan while southbound over the Hudson      Manhattan, New York - Northbound over the Hudson River


Premier Instructor Earns Master CFI Award


John Lampson, Master CFI

John Lampson, Master CFI.

 

Throughout his teens and well into his twenties, it was a love affair with the guitar and rock music that solely preoccupied this (then-future) aviator. It wasn't until reconnecting with an old high school friend some years later that John's attention took a turn in a completely unanticipated direction. Flying! "An evening flight with my old school friend and I was hooked! It was a beautiful night-flight from 4B8, along the CT and RI shoreline. The ride was smooth, the skies were clear, and the moon reflected off of the ocean like a scene from a movie".

It wasn't long after, (April 17, 1994, to be exact!), John took his introductory flight in a C-152 out of 7B9, an 1800' strip in Ellington, CT. "On Sept. 9 of that year, I flew home from my checkride at KBAF holding my temporary pilot certificate in hand, grinning from ear-to-ear!".

In the years to follow, John obtained his Instrument rating, commercial certificate, as well as multi-engine rating, and spent two summers building hours and experience flying for Connecticut Parachutists at his home-base in Ellington. “The next steps just seemed natural. Earn my AGI rating and my CFI".

More than 7500 hours later, (6200+ of dual-given), John continues to be more active than ever as a flight instructor and in the aviation community. John currently teaches at Premier Flight Center at Hartford/Brainard Airport (KHFD) in Hartford, CT, as well as, for LSA leader, Flight Design, providing factory training to customers, as well as demo flights and training for perspective buyers.

And as for the music...well, the love affair continues. "I have found instructing to be more gratifying than I could have imagined. It has been rewarding beyond my expectations. And at the same time, has afforded me the opportunity to continue playing my guitar and performing...giving me the best of both worlds!"

John currently plays with his band, Stealing Jupiter. You can find John, and Stealing Jupiter, on Facebook.

John is a 7500+ CFII, and holds SEL/SES, Multi-Engine/Commercial/Instrument privileges, as well as AGI.

Source: National Association of Flight Instructors: NAFINet.org

FAA’s Proposed Sleep Apnea Rule Explained

Editor's note: According to AOPA, on December 19, 2013, the FAA announced that it would delay implementation of this policy. Click here for additional details.

Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA) is a condition that prevents restorative sleep. “Sleep apnea” is literally a condition during which a person stops breathing for periods of time during their sleep. If left untreated, it can cause cardiac irregularities, excessive daytime sleepiness, cognitive impairment, high blood pressure, sudden cardiac death and personality disturbances.

Currently, many physicians feel that a man with a neck circumference of 17 inches or greater and/or a BMI (Body Mass Index) of greater than 40, has obstructive sleep apnea. Yet, it should be noted that up to 30% of individuals with a BMI less than 30 also have OSA! As a result of this significant health problem, the Federal Flight Surgeon recently published an editorial addressing the issue of obstructive sleep apnea.

The new policy set forth states that AME's (Aviation Medical Examiners) will be required to report the patient's BMI during the airman's medical certification process. If the BMI is greater than 40, the airman must have the issuance of his medical certificate DEFERRED, even if they currently hold a medical. Then, the airman must be evaluated by a Board-certified physician specializing in sleep medicine and undergo treatment if indicated prior to receiving a medical. The goal is to evaluate every airman whose BMI is 40 or greater. After this has been accomplished, the BMI threshold will be lowered!

The date for this policy to be implemented has not been announced; additionally, “how low” the new BMI requirement will be, has not been disclosed either.

By: Robert M. Dodenhoff, MD
Senior Aviation Medical Examiner
Assistant Clinical Professor of Medicine

 

Why “Knot?”

 

Did you ever wonder how a unit of speed came to be known as a knot? Since we were children we knew that with a knot or two, a rope could be transformed into a lasso for roping cattle, to tie bad guys to chairs or a young damsel to the railroad tracks by the scheming Snidely Whiplash only to be saved in the nick of time by the dashing Dudley Doright of Royal Canadian Mounted Police.

It would be a near impossibility to avoid having heard the term “knot” used as a measurement of speed. From cruise ships to commercial flights, “Top Gun” to “The Hunt for Red October” knots define speed! As pilots, or in my case a “pilot-to-be,” we use the term all time, but have you ever thought out its origin?

Well, thanks to a random series of channel changes during a sleepless night in yet another hotel room in a city and time zone so far from home, I landed on the Discovery Channel, and a special about 19th century pirates and how they survived and navigated the seas.

During that documentary the story of the knot was told, at least from a pirate’s perspective. Almost elegant in its simplicity, measuring speed in knots was a two man job using the tools of the time: rope, wind power, and a simple means of measuring time, the hourglass, or in their case, the thirty second glass.

The first step was to properly weight a flat block of wood, called a chip log, so that it would lay on top of the surface, weighted enough to resist forward motion. It was cast over the side, tied to a line on a reel on a rope with, yes knots tied at regular intervals which were “marked”, or measured against time. Until the mid-19th century this was the common method of measuring speed in a ship. The measurement for a knot at that time was 20.25 inches per second, which has deviated by only 0.02% using today’s scientifically calibrated machines

The knot was the basis of their navigation and dead reckoning, terms which have survived the test of time. These are the terms that are applied to flight today and also serve as the basis for flight terms, which we typically refer to in their short form. True Airspeed is properly known as Knots True Airspeed (KTAS), Indicate airspeed (KIAS), Calibrated (KCAS) and Equivalent airspeed (KEAS).

So the next time you do your rough translation of knots per hour to miles per hour for your non flying friends who ask, or even just for fun as you fly through the air, just be glad the mariners of the past tossed that chip log into the water, because I’m pretty sure there would be some serious rope burn if we tried feeding out a chip log from the cockpit at 120 knots or so…

John Bys is Student Pilot working toward his license on a Cessna 172 out of Hartford-Brainard Airport in Hartford, Connecticut.

Premier’s Instructors Test New David Clark DC-Pro-X Headset

The David Clark DC-Pro-X

Premier’s Terry Keller Jr. and Tim Chase were given an opportunity to put David Clark’s new DC-Pro-X headset to the test a few weeks ago, thanks to AOPA’s Jim Moore. Jim wanted some input from pilots who spend a lot of time each day wearing headsets. In short, Tim and Terry loved the new active noise cancelling headset from David Clark Co.!

The DC-Pro-X is amazingly light to wear, and rivals any other headset on the market for comfort. Unlike many headsets, the DC-Pro line sits on the ear, instead of having an ear cup that covers your ear. This means it is a cooler headset to wear, since air circulates around your ear, and the DC-Pro doesn’t interfere with wearing glasses. And while the passive noise cancelling feature is impressive, the active noise cancelling capabilities are exceptional!

Click here to read Jim’s article and see a video featuring the DC-Pro-X.

Editor's Note: According to a student who purchased the passive version of this headset, it comes with a "warning" against the use of the unit in piston powered airplanes.